UN Space Treaty Symposium

THIS IS A PAST EVENT – HYPERLINKS AND FORMS HAVE BEEN REMOVED

World-Space-Week-LogoDate: 10th October 2017

Start Time: 9.00 am
End Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: 27/29 South Lambeth Road, London, SW8 1SZ

50 Years of the UN Space Treaty: Looking Back, Looking Forward

The British Interplanetary Society is holding a one day symposium to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the UN Space Treaty which has been the foundation of Space law for half a century.

The programme (almost final) is as follows:

Registration/Refreshments

Welcome/Administration

The SPACE Project: Apparent limitations on constructing a space habitat imposed by the UN Treaty
Jerry Stone FBIS, Leader, The SPACE Project.  Freelance Space Presenter, Spaceflight UK
http://www.spaceflight-uk.com

International law relating to the mining of the deep seabed and outer space
Danny Greenland LLB LLM, Legal Researcher, The Northern Space Consortium
https://www.thensc-uk.com

Embedding sustainability: The future of the Outer Space Treaty?
Dr Chris Newman, Reader in Law, University of Sunderland
https://www.sunderland.ac.uk/about/staff/experts/chris_newman

Discussion

Lunch

Extraterrestrial Recidivism – Dispute, dissent and non-compliance in the Outer Space treaties
Mukesh Bhatt, Researcher and Guest Lecturer, School of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London
https://birkbeck.academia.edu/MukeshBhatt

‘The Common Heritage of Mankind’ meets ‘Star Trek’
Adam Manning LLB LLM, Civil Litigation Solicitor at Gurney-Champion & Co, Portsmouth
http://projection3.blogspot.co.uk

How would the Outer Space Treaty be different if drafted in 2017?
Raphael Costa, Executive Secretary of the French Institute for Space and Telecommunications Law
https://www.linkedin.com/in/raphael-costa-3918b7114/?ppe=1

Discussion

End

To book your place please click here.

On 27 January 1967, the UN Outer Space Treaty was opened for signature, and it came into force on 10 October that year. One of its main principles is that “Outer space … is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.” At the time, space activities were carried out by nations. Now, 50 years later, individual companies, such as SpaceX, Blue Origin and Orbital Sciences are running their own projects, and companies have announced plans for flights to the Moon and Mars.

In addition, back in the 1970s there were plans for large-scale space habitats that could be home to thousands of people. At the time, these plans assumed the primary source of materials would be the Moon, though recent work has updated this to include the asteroids. The SPACE Project is a BIS study to examine and update the plans from the 1970s. How might such activities be restricted by the provisions of the treaty? All of this raises questions about the use of space and its resources under current and future space projects, and the question of how the treaty applies in these new circumstances.

THIS IS A PAST EVENT – HYPERLINKS AND FORMS HAVE BEEN REMOVED
Be sociable; support the BIS!